Category Archives: Hubert Morken Best Book Award

APSA’s 2021 Hubert Morken Best Book Award

Dear APSA Religion and Politics Section Members,

We would like to invite nominations for APSA’s 2021 Hubert Morken Best Book Award. The Hubert Morken Award is given for the best book dealing with religion and politics published within the previous year. The criteria for the award include the originality of the argument presented, quality of the research, innovative methods, readability of the text and the policy or practical implications of the scholarship.

To be eligible for the award, books must have been published in 2020. The nomination should include a brief statement (250-750 words) summarizing the book’s contributions and why it is nominated for the award. This statement can be sent by email to the committee chair, David Buckley ([email protected]). 
 
As part of the nomination, publishers should send a hard copy of the nominated book to EACH member of the awards committee at the addresses below, making sure that the books arrive by the nomination deadline, March 15th, 2021.

Self nominations are welcome.

If you have any questions, please contact the committee chair, David Buckley ([email protected]

Committee Members Contact Information
 
Dr. David Buckley
Ford Hall, Department of Political Science
University of Louisville
Louisville, KY 40292

Dr. Laura Dudley Jenkins
Department of Political Science, ML#0375
University of Cincinnati
Cincinnati, OH 45221-0375

Dr. Eric McDaniel
13621 Campesina Dr.
Austin, TX 78727

 

2020 Hubert Morken Best Book in Religion and Politics Award

The winner:

Laura Dudley Jenkins. Religious Freedom and Mass Conversion in India. UPenn Press, 2019.

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Hinduism is the largest religion in India, encompassing roughly 80 percent of the population, while 14 percent of the population practices Islam and the remaining 6 percent adheres to other religions. The right to “freely profess, practice, and propagate religion” in India’s constitution is one of the most comprehensive articulations of the right to religious freedom. Yet from the late colonial era to the present, mass conversions to minority religions have inflamed majority-minority relations in India and complicated the exercise of this right.

In Religious Freedom and Mass Conversion in India, Laura Dudley Jenkins examines three mass conversion movements in India: among Christians in the 1930s, Dalit Buddhists in the 1950s, and Mizo Jews in the 2000s. Critics of these movements claimed mass converts were victims of overzealous proselytizers promising material benefits, but defenders insisted the converts were individuals choosing to convert for spiritual reasons. Jenkins traces the origins of these opposing arguments to the 1930s and 1940s, when emerging human rights frameworks and early social scientific studies of religion posited an ideal convert: an individual making a purely spiritual choice. However, she observes that India’s mass conversions did not adhere to this model and therefore sparked scrutiny of mass converts’ individual agency and spiritual sincerity.

Jenkins demonstrates that the preoccupation with converts’ agency and sincerity has resulted in significant challenges to religious freedom. One is the proliferation of legislation limiting induced conversions. Another is the restriction of affirmative action rights of low caste people who choose to practice Islam or Christianity. Last, incendiary rumors are intentionally spread of women being converted to Islam via seduction. Religious Freedom and Mass Conversion in India illuminates the ways in which these tactics immobilize potential converts, reinforce damaging assumptions about women, lower castes, and religious minorities, and continue to restrict religious freedom in India today.

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APSA Religion and Politics Section Hubert Morken Best Book Award – Call for Nominations

Dear APSA Religion and Politics Section Members,

We would like to invite nominations for APSA’s 2020 Hubert Morken Best Book Award. The Hubert Morken Award is given for the best book dealing with religion and politics published within the previous year. The criteria for the award include the originality of the argument presented, quality of the research, innovative methods, readability of the text and the policy or practical implications of the scholarship.

To be eligible for the award, books must have been published in 2019. The nomination should include a brief statement (250-750 words) summarizing the book’s contributions and why it is nominated for the award. This statement can be sent by email. As part of the nomination, publishers should send a copy of the nominated book to EACH member of the awards committee at the addresses below, making sure that the books arrive by the nomination deadline, March 15th, 2020.

Self nominations are welcome.

If you have any questions, please contact the committee chair,
Rina Williams ([email protected])

Committee Members Contact Information
Dr. Rina Williams
Dept. of Political Science
University of Cincinnati
Box 210375, Crosley Tower 1118
Cincinnati OH 45221-0375
[email protected]

Dr. Quin Monson
Political Science Dept.
Brigham Young University
745 Spencer W. Kimball Tower
Provo, UT 84602
[email protected]

Dr. Jonathan Agensky
Bentley Annex 211, 6 President St.
Department of Political Science
Ohio University
Athens, OH 45701
[email protected]

Religion and Politics 2019 Awards

The Religion and Politics organized section of the APSA is pleased to announce the following awards. Winners will be recognized at the section business meeting at this year’s annual conference. Congratulations to all the winners!

Ken Wald Best Graduate Student Paper Award

Consuelo Amat, Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society at Stanford University

“The Hydra Effect: When Repression Creates New Opposition against Authoritarianism”

Weber Best Conference Paper Award

Jonathan Chu, Perry World House the Department of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania
and
Carrie Lee, United States Air War College

“Race, Religion, and American Support for Humanitarian Intervention”

Aaron Wildavsky Dissertation Award

Jason Klocek, University of California Berkeley

“The Cult of Coercion: Religion and Strategic Culture in British Counterinsurgency.”

Ted Jelen Best Journal Article Award

Elizabeth Sperber, University of Denver
and
Erin Hern, Syracuse University

Pentecostal Identity and Citizen Engagement in Sub-Saharan Africa: New Evidence from Zambia

Hubert Morken Best Book Award

Marie-Eve Reny, University of Montreal

Authoritarian Containment: Public Security Bureaus and Protestant House Churches in Urban China, Oxford University Press, 2018

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2018 Hubert Morken Best Book Award – Call for Nominations

Dear APSA Religion and Politics Section Members,

We would like to invite nominations for APSA’s 2018 Hubert Morken Best Book Award.  The Hubert Morken Award is given for the best book dealing with religion and politics published during the last two years. The criteria for the award include the originality of the argument presented, quality of the research, innovative methods, readability of the text and the policy or practical implications of the scholarship.

To be eligible for the award, books must have been published in 2016 or 2017. The nomination should include a brief statement (250-750 words) summarizing the book’s contributions and why it is nominated for the award. This statement can be sent by email. As part of the nomination, publishers should send a copy of the nominated book to EACH member of the awards committee at the addresses below, making sure that the books arrive by the nomination deadline, March 15th, the latest.

Self nominations are welcome.

If you have any questions, please contact the committee chair, Nukhet A. Sandal ([email protected]).

Committee Members Contact Information

Nukhet A. Sandal
Associate Professor
Ohio University
Department of Political Science
Bentley Annex 259
Athens OH 45701
[email protected]

Jim Guth
Professor
Department of Politics and International Affairs
111T Johns Hall
Furman University
Greenville SC 29613
[email protected]

Ani Sarkissian
Associate Professor
Department of Political Science
Michigan State University
368 Farm Lane, S303
East Lansing, MI 48824
[email protected]

Amy Erica Smith
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science
Iowa State University
503 Ross Hall
Ames, IA 50011
[email protected]