Category Archives: Section Member

Do you teach a course on religion and politics? Survey from Paul Djupe

Dear Section Members,

Do you teach a course on religion and politics, public life, or law? Could you please click to the (anonymous) survey posted on the Section APSA Connect Forum and tell us about it? It will take you 3 minutes or less (and has been approved by my IRB).

We just want to know some basic facts — who has taught one, to how many students, and approximately how frequently – that would serve a useful function for potential R&P authors. We are always asked about this sort of thing for book prospectuses and we always have to wing it; wouldn’t it be nice to have some statistics to share? This is our chance to gather that. We’ll prepare a report that you can use to help motivate interest in your work.

Second, we would like to create a syllabus archive for R&P courses that the community can draw upon. These will be posted on religioninpublic.blog as they roll in. Whether you wish to share a syllabus or not, we encourage you to share some basic facts about the course(s) you teach. Doing so should engender no risks to you. Of course your participation is voluntary and you can skip any question you wish, including uploading a syllabus. Clearly your syllabus will not be anonymous, but your replies to the first six questions will be held in confidence and will be anonymous if you do not provide voluntary contact information.

Thanks for sharing your experience with us. If you have any questions, feel free to email me at pdjupe@gmail.com

Best Wishes,

Paul Djupe, Denison University

Interview: Immediate Past Section Chair, Hurd, by E-International Relations

Hurd-700x394What motivated you to write your latest book Beyond Religious Freedom?

Beyond Religious Freedom is my response to what I see as a need to rethink how we approach the study of religion and politics in the field of international relations. There’s been a gold-rush mentality lately as scholars scurry to ‘get religion right’ – but many of these efforts are confused, or even troubling. The problem, as I discuss in more detail elsewhere, is that international relations ‘got religion’ but got it wrong. Beyond Religious Freedom encourages scholars to step back from the political fray. It neither celebrates religion for its allegedly peaceful potential nor condemns it for its allegedly violent tendencies. Instead, I propose a new conceptual framework for the study of religion and public life. It accounts for the gaps and tensions that I perceived between the large-scale international legal, political and religious engineering projects undertaken in the name of religious freedom, toleration, and rights, and the realities of the individuals and communities subjected to these efforts.

This disjuncture is reflected on the cover, in a photo taken by Samia Errazzouki of the desert with a sand berm in the distance and hand-made flowers sticking out of the sand in the foreground. The Moroccans built the berm in the 1980s during the war against the Polisario in an effort to divide Western Sahara, which they control, from the free zone controlled by the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic. The flowers … {more here}

The interview was conducted by John A. Rees during a symposium on ‘The Politics of Religious Freedom in the Asia-Pacific’ hosted by the Religion and Global Society Program, an initiative of the Institute for Ethics and Society at the University of Notre Dame Australia.

Book: Beyond Religious Freedom: The New Global Politics of Religion. Princeton University Press, 2015. – amazon   |   barnes&noble